Un chien andalou, Luis Bunuel
Belle de jour, Luis Bunuel
Man with a Movie Camera, Dziga Vertov
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Robert Wiene
Meshes in the Afternoon, Maya Deren
At Land, Maya Deren
Meditations on Violence, May Deren
Shadows, John Cassavetes
The Act of Seeing with One's Own Eyes, Stan Brakhage
Window, Water, Baby, Moving, Stan Brakhage
Moth Light, Stan Brakhage
wavelength for those who don't have the time, Michael Snow
News From Home, Chantal Akerman
Birthday Suit, Lisa Steele
Joan + Steve, Monique Moumblow
100 videos, Steve Reinke
The Middle Distance, Yudi Sewraj
Letters from Home, Mike Hoolboom

and others...

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

script formatting

scripts for your in-camera project are due this week. they need not be presented in traditional script format BUT they must be complete insofar as they provide a thorough outline/sketch of the film--the audio and visual terrain, including descriptive components and dialogue. below is the script that i showed in class.

Using found footage, voice-over narration, ambient sound and dialogue,
State of Grace recounts what I was doing on the day that JFK was shot.
It’s also a coming of age-story—about how knowledge is gleaned and values
absorbed in a state of distraction.

Scene One: Everything I know I learned at my aunt frances’ beauty salon
Aunt France’s Beauty Salon, sunny day, mid-afternoon

∑ The scene opens with a fade-in from yellow /white as if walking inside on a sunny day (film the sun then film the entrance to an age/business appropriate doorway)
∑ Camera close on a still photograph of a beauty salon from the 1960s (shot at eye-level perspective, from the door) depicting a row of women sitting under the hair dryers reading magazines
∑ Closer to magazines—in hands, on table-tops
∑ re-enact or use found footage of mid-range, frontal shot of two women in conversation sitting under the dryer
∑ a found moving, exterior shot of an site appropriate setting (mainstreet of a small town…) Audio
∑ Sounds of traffic give way to water running, hairdryers, am radio (“Maybelline,” Love, Love me do…)
∑ Voice-over narration:
“Every week, my mother visited my aunt Frances’ beauty salon for a wash and set, sometimes colour and a perm, and, more importantly, a chance to catch up with the girls. Each week the same group of women would meet on the same day and at the same time readying themselves for their weekends of dinner parties and family get-togethers or just to freshen up their look. As the radio played, the women caught up with their news: talk of fashion and fandom, hairstyles and dresses, movie stars and public life gave way to news of families, neighbours and lovelorn friends. And sometimes, in whispers the women talked about absent others”

Scene two: beauty treatments and bearded ladies
Aunt Frances Beauty Salon mid-day

Found footage, mid-range shot of salon
∑ Found footage, mid-range shot of a salon
∑ Still or moving: Interior close-up of woman with mask
∑ Found footage of machinery of beauty salon
∑ Found footage or still of torture chamber
∑ Colour picture of a tomato
∑ Colour picture of a peach

∑ Background salon sounds
∑ Auntie Frances (VO)
“Yup you’ll never see her here. Never goes out in public during the day. Her husband drops her off before he goes to work in the morning and she takes a taxi home after she’s done here. Poor dear is hairy as an ape. A real bearded lady. Lucky for her I’ve got this new electrolysis machine. She comes twice a week for half an hour—the whole time I’m zapping and plucking out her hair. That’s pretty much all anybody can endure. She’s red as a tomato when she leaves. It’s painful, I’m sure, but worth it. It grows back but weaker each time, until its just a little fuzz.” Soon she’ll be pretty as a peach.”

Monday, October 8, 2007

production assignment - things to know/do

Experimental Film: Production Project

This assignment asks students to work in pairs preparing and producing a two to three minute long, experimental video. The assignment will involve the preparation and presentation of a storyboard (5%) and shooting script (5%), and the production of the video project itself (15%). The storyboard and shooting script will be submitted November 5/6. The video work will be produced in class November 19/20 and screened in class November 26/27

The production of an in-camera work requires careful preparation and planning. Before shooting you and your partner must have decided on the subject and theme of the tape, how it will look and sound, where it will be shot, what props, actors and/or actresses you will need and the final sequence for the story. A storyboard and shooting script are essential tools for organizing the project.

The storyboard is primarily visual, with a small amount of written description. It sketches the essential details needed to communicate the information in each scene. The shooting script, on the other hand, provides a written account of the story, in greater detail. The shooting script includes the following components: the location and time of day for each scene; a narrative description of the entrance, exits and emotional states of the characters; narrative descriptions for the actions, settings and props; and dialogue (see reverse for an example of a page of script). Camera direction should be used sparingly. Instead, let the description indicate the camera angles or movement. Each change of scene/location/character requires a new header and narrative description. Use the format guide on the reverse side of this sheet to help you format your script. (One page of script represents one minute of film time.)

Step 1: Development: Brainstorming and Idea Generation
Step 2: Flesh out the idea by identifying key scenes
Step 3: Write the script
Step 4: Prepare the Storyboard
Step 5: Production